A country with a rich culture and even richer history, your visit to the capital of England is not complete without visiting some of the exciting museums the city has to offer. You can explore the area’s natural history, literary history, and even athletic history in our guide to London’s museums, complete with all of the information you need to pay them a visit.

British Museum

Dedicated to the human history and culture, this museum has some permanent worldly exhibitions along with a few special attractions, one of which will be fascinating for anyone visiting from Australia. With over 8 million works, the museum is among the largest and most expansive in the world and boasts the proud title of one of the oldest in the world, being established in 1753.

You’ll find galleries based on Africa, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece & Rome, Asia, Europe, Middle East, & Themed Galleries. You cannot visit this museum without stopping at the special exhibit Indigenous Australia: Enduring Civilisation. This exhibit runs from 23 April to 2 August. Two other exciting special exhibits are Defining Beauty: the body in Ancient Greek art which runs from now until 5 July and Shifting Patterns: Pacific Barkcloth Clothing running from now until 6 December.

Gallery Overview

  • The Enlightenment Era
  • Egyptian Sculpture
  • Ancient Lives, New Discoveries
  • Assyrian Sculpture
  • Athens & Lycia
  • Mausoleum of Halicarnassus
  • Europe 1900-present
  • Mesopotamia

Where is it?

Bloomsbury

How do I get there?

Take the Central or Piccadilly Line to the Holborn station on the Tube

How much is it?

This museum has free admission.

Hours

The British Museums is open from 10am-5:30pm, daily.

London Transportation Museum

In this museum, you can explore the story of London, its transportation, as well as, the people who have travelled and worked in the city during the last 200 years.  You will be able to explore London Transport when the Industrial Revolution was picking up. You can take a look at the designs that started it all along with how the growth of suburbs affected the area’s transportation.

Gallery overview

  • 19th-century London
  • Steam Underground 1863-1905
  • Growth of the Suburbs
  • Design for Travel
  • On the Surface 1900-1945
  • On the Surface after 1945
  • London’s Transport at War

Where is it?

Covent Garden

How do I get there?

Take the Piccadilly Line to Covent Garden stop on the Tube.

How much is it?

  • 17 & Under-Free
  • Adults -17£ (32 AUD)

Hours

  • Saturday-Thursday: 10-6
  • Friday: 11-6

Museum of London

When you visit this museum, you’ll have a chance to peek into London all the way back in the prehistoric times. Explore the city that was once ruled by the Romans and the Saxons, check out the famous medieval London, and walk through the streets of Victorian London, as well as, recreated gardens. The museum also hosts a bevy of special events such as a Sleepover at the Museum, where you get full reign of the museum after hours, you get a three-course dinner, comedy performances, etc. Also, running until 12 April, is a special exhibit on Sherlock Holmes, the English character that has captivate audiences for over a century. Among the other exhibitions are The Crime Museum Uncovered, Mind Maze, and The London 2012 Cauldron: designing a moment.

Gallery Overview

  • London before London
  • Roman London
  • Medieval London
  • War, Plague, and Fire
  • Expanding City: 1666-1850s
  • People’s City: 1850s-1940s
  • World City: 1950s-today

Where is it?

London Wall

How do I get there?

You can get off at the Barbican stop, accessible via the Circle, Hammersmith & City, and Metropolitan lines or use the St. Paul’s stop on the Central line on the Tube.

How much is it?

Free!

Hours

Open daily 10-6

Charles Dickens Museum

Perhaps one of London’s most famous authors, Charles Dickens wrote Victorian works that are still being enjoyed today, including Oliver Twist and A Christmas Carol. The Museum was transformed out of the residence where Dickens’ lived from 1837-1839. It was here that two of his daughters were born, where his sister-in-law went to her final rest, and where many of his greatest works were penned.

In the museum, you can check out over 100,000 items including manuscripts, rare editions, personal items, paintings, etc. You can walk through rooms decorated in early Victorian style as they might have been when Dickens lived there. The museum hosts many exciting events such as a weekly reading group, costumed tours, and the museum by candlelight.

Where is it?

Holborn

How do I get there?

Take the Piccadilly Line on the Tube to Russell Square

How much is it?

  • Adults: 8£ (15 AUD)
  • Children 6-16: 4£ (8 AUD)
  • Children Under 6: Free

Hours

The Charles Dickens Museum is open daily, from 10-5pm.

Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum

The oldest tennis tournament in the world is held every year at the All England Club, where it has been held since 1877. While the prestigious match brings out close to 40,000 spectators, the museum will be a less crowded way to experience the match.

The rundown

Catch a glimpse at the championship trophies or stroll through memorabilia lane with items dating back to 1555. The kids will love the interactive consoles and the 3D film capturing the essence of Wimbledon. You can catch a glimpse of outfits worn by many of the champions along with special mementos they have generously donated.

Where is it?

Wimbledon Park

How do I get there?

Take the District line on the Tube to Wimbledon Park

How much is it?

Adults

  • 13£ (25 AUD)-Museum Only
  • 24£ (45 AUD)-Museum & Tour

Children

  • 8£ (15 AUD)-Museum Only
  • 15£ (28 AUD)-Museum & Tour

Now that you are up on the museums of London (the list keeps going, if you are still thirsting for knowledge and exhibits, by the way), you can finish planning out your itinerary. With so much history and culture, it’s no wonder people flock to England, and more specifically, London, to take in the superb exhibits and more. Protect your historical adventures and holiday to London as a whole with international travel insurance.

Image courtesy of Flickr user Paul Hudson